A computer repairman from Las Vegas was charged on Friday in Manhattan with threatening to kill New York lawyers who have filed an anti-discrimination suit on behalf of 11 black employees at Fox News, the police and prosecutors said.

The repairman, Joseph D. Amico, 46, was arraigned in State Supreme Court in Manhattan on three counts of making terrorist threats and one count of aggravated harassment, a day after being extradited from Nevada. Justice Laura Ward ordered him held until a bail hearing on Monday.

On April 26, Mr. Amico made several calls to Wigdor L.L.P., the firm representing the Fox News employees. He threatened to blow up the firm’s Fifth Avenue office and to shoot its partners for pursuing the suit against Fox News, lacing his comments with derogatory comments about blacks, Lt. Paul Ng, a spokesman for the New York Police Department, said.

The calls started shortly after the lawyers, Douglas H. Wigdor and Jeanne M. Christensen, appeared with the plaintiffs in a televised news conference announcing a class-action tort, alleging that Fox News executives tolerated “abhorrent, intolerable, unlawful and hostile racial discrimination” in the workplace.

The lawsuit contends that Fox News employees repeatedly complained about racial discrimination to executives but that no action was taken. A separate lawsuit filed in federal court in Manhattan made similar claims. Fox News has denied the allegations.

The broadcast of the news conference infuriated Mr. Amico, the police said. In one telephone conversation with Mr. Wigdor, he threatened to kill the lawyer and his family for supporting black plaintiffs and used a racial slur to describe them. “I was disturbed and shocked and very worried,” Mr. Wigdor said in an interview on Friday. “I took this explicit death threat very seriously.”

New York detectives located Mr. Amico using telephone records. On May 10, two detectives traveled to Las Vegas and tried to take Mr. Amico into custody at his house.

But Mr. Amico, who the police said has a lengthy arrest record in both Nevada and New York, barricaded himself inside and refused to come out. A tense standoff ensued. Fearing Mr. Amico might be armed, Las Vegas officers with assault rifles surrounded the single-family home on Flagler Street.

Five hours later, the SWAT team entered the house and found Mr. Amico in an attic, Officer Michael Rodriguez, a spokesman for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, said.

Mr. Amico’s lawyer, Todd Spodek, said his client would fight the charges. “Words can be misinterpreted,” he said outside court. “And in this political climate people are so worked up about the issues that it’s very easy for words to be misunderstood and hysteria to take place.”

Mr. Wigdor’s firm also represents plaintiffs in a racial discrimination suit against The New York Times.